Friday, March 24, 2017

Greening as you don't want it

These days, the word 'Greening' has come to be associated with being kind to the environment and improving our atmosphere, but in my world, my boaty environment, greening is not such a good thing.

I'm sure you all know what happens to your garden paving over the winter months, don't you? The moss grows and yes, everything turns a not so pretty shade of rather turgid green. It may surprise you (or perhaps it doesn't) to know that this happens to boats too - only the trouble with boats is that the greening only seems occur in awkward to get at places; as if it's determined to make the maximum trouble possible. 

In the Vereeniging's case, these are the spots that I either have to fold myself into something only a professional contortionist would deem comfortable, or I have to hang myself perilously over the side of the barge to scrape and scrub the insidious mossy growth off the hardwood rubbing rail that runs right round the hull. This, I should say, is the worst. The problem is that I'm (or rather the Vereeniging is) currently sandwiched between two other barges. Using the little (mouldy green) boat is therefore not an option. Defying death by faith in my ability not to slide off the hatches and between the boats is the only thing. Such a scenario, dear landlubbers, is not one of the upsides of owning a barge.

I love my Vereeniging as everyone who knows me is aware, but this is one mouldy (sorry!) job that I would gladly do without. Each year, I look for ways to try and prevent it, but barring waging chemical warfare on the surrounding waters, I have yet to find a good solution.

Since the fish don't deserve to swim round in an evil soup of my making, I shall just have to bite my own bullet and send myself into suspended animation over the side again. Weather permitting, I'll be wielding the brushes tomorrow. Have a good weekend everyone!


A neat and clean Vereeniging after its summer smoosh up

18 comments:

  1. If I were there I'd gladly sit on your legs to keep you from sliding off the hatches

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    1. You would if you could but you can't :)

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  2. Good luck and stay safe! Please don't hurt yourself xxx

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    1. I'll do my best, Fran...I mean, not to...:) xxx

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  3. Could you not hire one of those students that are kicking around,lol! Seriously,be careful. And to think I'm moaning because our garden decking need a good scrub as its slippy with moss. At least I can stand up straight with a large broom to clean it.

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    1. Hmm, now there's a thought, Anne! That might be difficult, though. I'd have to prise them away from their phones :)

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  4. Hi Val, Stay safe while de-mossing your barge. Interesting to see Vereeniging in full though, but I'm confused as to how you actually access the inside!?

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    1. Ah, Carol, it's a cunning disguise! The entrance is under the tarpaulin on the left as you look at the photo. It's a lift-up hinged hatch, but when I leave, I pull the tarpaulin over it and secure it so no one can see how to get in :) I often leave it unlocked when I'm just away for an hour or so...no one can see how to get in, so it's quite safe!

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  5. To think I was grumbling about doing my back steps!

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    1. Ah Jo, it's all relative, isn't it? I have other compensations...I was going to say I have no rising damp, but then I'd be very worried if I did!

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  6. Oh that damn moss ! It forms on my pathways fortunately I have found an inexpensive remedy by giving it regular washes of neat urine it does the trick.

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    1. Well, at least that's a cheap, natural solution, Mel :) I use cleaning vinegar...probably much the same effect!

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  7. You are extraordinary and courageous, Val! We are overrun with moss here...but we can ignore it! Since it's not on a barge...we just walk over it and pretend we're in an enchanted forest - like "Hansel & Gretel." Do be careful.

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    1. In its place, it's pretty, I agree, Steph :) But it's done now, and I've survived. As you can see, I haven't become sandwich spread yet :)

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  8. It's funny how colours can convey opposite emotions. Green to me usually means the brightness of spring and life, but as you say it can mean mouldy and unpleasant. Yellow is a lovely bright colour to me, meaning sunshine - but it can also mean the "sere and yellow leaf" the sign of decline. Blue suggests blue skies, but one often feels blue... and so on. In Japan they have moss gardens, but I am not going to suggest you bother to look them up !! :D

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    1. Oddly, green is one of my favourite colours, Jenny, but it depends on where I see it!

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  9. My goodness, how fascinating. I often wondered what it would be like to live on a barge. It is a subject which has long fascinated me. I'll be back.

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