Saturday, May 15, 2010

Koos's progress

Two days and two posts...what's happening? Well, summer is coming and that's when we get busy with the boats. Added to that, my work gets back to more reasonable levels, and I actually have time to think about things other than lesson plans and student assessments. I'm still going to be quite busy but nothing like as hectic as it has been up to now.

Anyhow, the ongoing story of the Hennie haha (our shared project)is always lurking, and while I was in Rotterdam teaching last week, Koos was in Zelzate grinding away at the doubling plates that have to come off the Hennie Ha for its insurance inspection.

To cut a long story short, the previous owner replaced the bottom with good 6mm steel, but only doubled the curvy bits along the sides. This he did with 3mm steel. Big mistake. The insurance company requires a minimum thickness of 3mm and their testing machines will only measure the outer layer. With a few years of degradation, then the thickness measured was less than the necessary 3mm, so they told us all this doubling had to come off so they could measure the real thickness off the original hull.

We are holding fingers, toes and thumbs that the old iron hull will measure up. Meanwhile, Koos's labours can be seen in the pics here. He has been grinding for all he is worth, and has done a great job of stripping the dreaded doubling away. It will be several days before he has finished this stage, but I think he's doing really well. It's very hard work and needs lots of stamina and patience, so hats off Koosje. You're the hero of the week!









21 comments:

  1. I'll add my toes and fingers to the group cross. You really do work very hard with the barges, don't you? I suspect a lot of people think of the barge life as endlessly romantic, but I can see there is much work involved.

    Well done, Koos!

    xx
    AM

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  2. Keep up the good work Koos, it is worth it in the end! You would have had to do this some time ago in the UK as the insurance comapanies here insist on 4mm as the minimum. x

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  3. Hubby just saw this and said..."I wonder if we can find something in fibre glass..hmmmmm"

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  4. Thanks Anne Marie, yes, Barge owners do have to work hard. It goes with the territory. If you want to see another work in progress, take a look at Fran's web page. She and her Pete have also embarked on a major project!

    Fran, I didn't know that but am not surprised. The UK has always been much twitchier about safety than they are over here.

    Lol Janys, he has a point, he really does, but somehow fibreglass doesn't quite do it in the barge fraternity!

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  5. Certainly doesn't turn me on either... though I have to admit that we were looking at some fancy boats the other day going for a cool 8 million. They were the right length though...

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  6. AM is right, lots of work, constant upkeep! In some ways does it make you even more attached to the barges? I know I get that way when I work on a house continually.

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  7. Oh yes, the life of a boat owner - maintenance, upkeep, fuel costs etc. for even those that are made of fibre glass!

    My fingers and toes are crossed too.

    Keep up the good work! oh, and I'm glad you're getting to the point where you have a more balanced lifestyle (at least for the next few months).

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  8. The maintenance of boats is far harder and more regular than the tasks that house owners have - I believe ;-) Having said that we are replacing the roof on our cottage this year, the present has been on for 60 years.
    I'm not convinced that GRP (fibreglass) hulls are any better than steel, wood or concrete, they all need TLC.
    GRP is prone to osmosis (softening) after a number of years, due to ultraviolet rays of sunshine and discolouration.

    All power to Koos elbows !

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  9. AHV...if I could afford to pay 8 million for a fibre glass boat, I assume that I would also be in a position to pay someone to give it lots and lots of TLC!

    However, the harsh reality is that this is not the case, and so I can see us joining Koos with his oxyacetylene at some point.

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  10. It looks like it is turning into a bigger and bigger project :)

    I hope the hull passes the measurement test. I'm sure Koos will get it canal worth.

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  11. Will you replace the doubling, or cut and weld new plate in?

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  12. Thanks again everyone.

    Janys, you're right, but then so is Heron. They all need maintenance ;-P

    String, it does make you more attached to them...all that work and suffering is very bonding!

    Stu, it's been a project and a half from day one, but wasn't meant to be quite so much work!

    Tim, we will see what the original hull is like and then decided what to do. I think we will probably just double it with thicker steel where necessary.

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  13. Oops, I missed Leslie here. Thanks for all the fingers, toes and thumbs. We need them for this one. Just to add a note to why it's so important, one of our friend's boats - a work in progress too - sank in the harbour this morning. The cost of getting it recovered doesn't bear thinking of. I feel so very sorry for our friend....

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  14. Impressive work indeed by Koos, I'll raise a glass to you! Good luck with the inspection, fingers crossed that it'll turn out ok.

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  15. Oh my, those barges are a lot of work! It must make up for not having to mow the lawn...

    Fingers, toes and eyes duly crossed in hopes that you get your Hennie Ha Ha ship-shape and seaworthy.

    Insurance! Bah!

    xx

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  16. that looks like a lot of work, and hard work at that! I mean, it's not like repairing the gutters or something, it's the bottom of a boat/barge!! Definetley kudos to Koos! oh my....

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  17. So sorry to hear about your friends boat sinking. Wow boating sounds quite daunting

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  18. Oh no, a barge sank? It must be akin to a death in the family among you harbour folk. I am so sorry.
    ... as I just finished watching Pirate Radio.
    Great movie, by the way!

    xx

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  19. OMG, what a tedious work...!
    If you make a new doubling I would recommend shot-blasting and a layer of flame-zinc-spray on top of the whole hull before painting with two-pack zinc rich polyurethane primer and top coat. Then you might forget about it for the next twenty years to come.
    The snag is that it will cost you multi-kEUR... :(
    Anyway, keep up the good work, give my best regards to Koos and Happy Birthday to you Val!

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  20. Happy birthday, Val! I hope you have a great day.

    xx
    AM

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  21. Happy Birthday Val!! I hope you had a special day, you deserve it. xoxo

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